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John Patrick Looney

John Patrick Looney was a gangster in Rock Island, Illinois during the early 20th century. Looney served as the model for John Looney, a character in Max Allan Collins' graphic novel Road to Perdition. The character was renamed John Rooney and portrayed by Paul Newman...

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The Whyos Gang

The Whyos Gang were a street gangs of New York, they were the city's dominant street gang during the mid-late 19th century. The gang controlled most of Manhattan from the late 1860s until the early 1890s. Consisting largely of criminals ranging from pickpockets to...

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Mulberry Street / Mulberry Bend

The photo is a picture of an unnamed real Gang of New York in Bandits Roost an alley somewhere in Mulberry Street. Its part of an exhibition called How The Other Half Live by photographer Jacob Riis. If the Five Points of Manhattan was the poorest, most crime-ridden...

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The Short Tails

The Short Tails (Not to be confused with the Shirt Tails, who were an earlier gang) This is a photo of a real Gang of New York, under a pier in Corlears Hook, it was taken in 1888 and part of an exhibition called How The Other Half Lives by photographer Jacob Riis...

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The Child Gangs of New York

The photo is a child gang of orphans that lived in the alleys somewhere around Mulberry Street and was taken in 1888. It was part of an exhibition called How The Other Half Live by Jacob Riis. In early New York child gangs were mainly confined to the Five Points, the...

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The Bowery Bum’s

The photo is from inside the Oak Street Police Station. Its part of a collection called How The Other Half Live the picture was taken by Jacob Riis in 1888 Back in Old New York there were many characters and many crazy stories, the homeless had their stories too, they...

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Dive bars, saloons and other places of sin

The photo is a picture of an unnamed dive bar on Thompson Street. Its part of an exhibition called How The Other Half Live, the photo was taken by Jacob Riis in 1888. Throughout early New York dive bars were as violent and dangerous as any of the other places around,...

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